Lessons learned from two cycles on the 17 day diet

Today’s post is written, since I have been so busy I haven’t had time to get in front of the camera!

Tomorrow is the first day of Cycle 1, third go-around.  I KNOW!  When is this going to end???  Well, until I hit my goal weight, this is the plan.  I thought I’d reflect on what I’ve learned from this last Cycle 3 session.

Starting out, I want to let everyone know that I’ve really done well moderating my body image issues and my relationship with food.  Granted, Cycle 3 helps me with that because I pretty much eat whatever I want, but summertime is good for that too.  Lots of tasty food, cookouts and frosty beverages make me forget about diets!

Because of this, however, I didn’t lose anything at all in this last Cycle 3.  I am still not convinced that I have some food sensitivities, since I noticed some pretty big gains on the scale overnight when I ate any corn or wheat products.

Things I learned on this last Cycle 3:

  1. If you expect to maintain weight loss, you can’t go back to eating like you did before you started trying to lose weight.  Enough said.
  2. There is a difference between feeling full and being satisfied.  I can eat Kevin under the table- my portions are huge.  I’m still learning how to eat and stop before I feel stuffed.
  3. Find out what you can splurge on without blowing the scale.
  4. Vary foods that you think you may have sensitivities to, making sure you don’t have that same food every day.  I learned this after two days straight of the suspect food.
  5. Notice how you feel after eating, even hours later.  I find I am much less sluggish on Cycle 1 foods and have less headaches.
  6. It is important to weigh every day to understand how your body reacts to different foods, if you suspect sensitivities.

This brings me to the topic of weighing every day.

 ”Should you weigh everyday?

I don’t know if it’s a good idea or not.  I know everyone has a different opinion on the topic and I think it’s a good idea to keep yourself aware of the reasons for every point of view.  What I do know is that my relationship with the scale has changed in my bikini journey over the past few years.

When I was gaining weight during my doctoral program I rarely weighed myself. If you will remember from my first blog, I slowly put on the pounds during the time I was taking classes, but I really packed them on during my dissertation and when I hurt myself two years ago.   I occasionally stood on the scale but got so depressed to see the numbers going up, up, and up that I just quit weighing. When I joined Weight Watchers, I weighed in once a week but it became a very stressful event.  I would starve myself on Sundays to make sure I had good weigh-ins on Monday.  It was not good.  If I even went up two pounds during a weigh in, I would obsess about my points and make adjustments to my eating.  In my head, I knew it was bad, but the audience and the approval of my leader made me incredibly stressed out.

During my recent journey to lose weight I committed to myself to weigh everyday. While it can impart additional body image issues, I needed to do the daily weigh-ins to make sure I was getting feedback.  Especially when I lost so quickly.  I didn’t want to be unhealthy. One thing I learned very quickly however, was that the scale won’t move down every day, or even every week. In fact, I became very attuned to the rhythms of my body when it came to losing weight. Certain times of the month were harder than others, and I understood that weight fluctuates. I also learned that the overall trend was the most important, not a straight line on a chart going down.  A study from the University of Minnesota showed that daily weighing results in double the weight loss over a two year time span.  

So where do I go from here?  Tomorrow marks the beginning of another Cycle 1.  20 pounds and six cycles later, I’m feeling like I’ll hit my goal weight this year.  I really hope so, at least.

Until then, I’m learning about myself, my body, and how food can help or hurt, and remembering that the scale isn’t everything.

 

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